Person

Clemens Hoffmann (On Leave)

Assistant Professor

Clemens Hoffmann (On Leave)

Address:

Department of International Relations
Bilkent University
06800 Bilkent Ankara

Office:

A312

Phone:

+90 312 290 2215

E-mail:



Personal Website:



 

Biography:

Clemens Hoffmann (DPhil) joined the Department of International Relations in September 2012. His research interests include critical and historical materialist IR theory, Political Ecology and processes of state formation and secession in both theory and practice of international relations. He looks at the processes giving rise to modern systems of rule within their respective geo-ecological contexts and the continued processes of social reproduction. Geographically his work focusses on the entire post-Ottoman world, especially the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus and the two Sudans.

Prior to his arrival at Bilkent, Dr Hoffmann received his DPhil from the University of Sussex in 2010, followed by a postdoctoral research fellowship working on the European Commission 7th Framework Programme project on climate change, hydro-conflicts and human security. Comparing the ‘Divided Environments’ of Sudan, Cyprus and Israel-Palestine, the project investigates the relationship between conflict and environmental change as rooted in processes of uneven development, territorial partition and post-colonial state formation.

Dr Hoffmann’s doctoral thesis problematizes the conceptual relationship between geopolitics, capitalism, nationalism and the evolution of the ‘modern’ interstate system beyond Europe, speaking to questions of critical and historical IR theory. Further examining this relationship between capitalism and geopolitics within the regional context of the post-Ottoman world, his interests also include Turkey's new proactive foreign policy, sometimes labelled ‘Neo-Ottomanism’.


Education:

  • BA International Relations with Politics, University of Wales, Swansea
  • MA International Relations, University of Sussex
  • DPhil International Relations, University of Sussex

Research:

Out Now:

Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict and Security, Edited by Jan Selby, Clemens Hoffmann